First Aid for Babies and Kids

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Mums are the babies’ first doctors, right? By simply kissing their tears away, a bruise suddenly feels nothing as if it doesn’t exist. Magically, when can take our kids’ pain in a split second- our weapons, kiss and hugs.

However, for the more serious injuries, we couldn’t just to resort to our magical cuddles. It is important to perform the correct first aid procedures.

Singapore First Aid Training Centre believes every parent should have basic first aid skills, including 24-hour First Aid and CPR program that covers all emergencies in children that can happen at home or at play. It is designed especially for those working or staying with children to render help in critical times. If you want to know more about their basic courses you can visit this link.

Here is a brief overview of how to use first aid in important medical situations.

Choking
How to deal with a choking baby or child is a skill all parents should know. Remember: The procedure is slightly different for babies (under one) and children (aged one to puberty). Follow the steps below:

For a baby (birth to one):
1. If the baby is unable to cough, lay them face down along your forearm (with their head low) and support their body and head.
2. Using the heel of your hand, give up to five back blows between their shoulder blades.
3. Turn them face up along your other forearm, supporting their body and head and check their mouth for any dislodged objects.
4. If they are still choking, place two fingers on the lower half of the baby’s breastbone (a finger’s breadth below the nipples) and give up to five sharp thrusts, inwards and towards the head.
5. Check the mouth for any dislodges objects.
6. Give three full cycles of back blows and chest thrusts, checking the mouth after each full cycle.
7. If this does not work call an ambulance until and repeat the back blows and abdominal thrusts until help arrives. If the child becomes unconscious, give CPR.

For a child (one to puberty):
1. If they are unable to cough up the obstruction, bend the child over and give them five sharp blows between the shoulder blades with the heel of the hand.
2. Check the mouth for dislodged objects.
3. If they are still choking, give the child abdominal thrusts. To do this place a clenched fist above their belly button and grasp your fist with your other hand. Pull inwards and upwards five times.
4. Check the mouth for dislodged objects.
5. If they are still choking, give three cycles of back blows and abdominal thrusts. Check the mouth after each cycle.
6. If this does not work call an ambulance until and repeat the back blows and abdominal thrusts until help arrives. If the child becomes unconscious, give CPR.

CPR
If your baby or child is unconscious and not breathing, CPR is a crucial technique that can potentially save their life. Remember: The procedure is slightly different for babies (under one) and children (aged one to puberty). Follow the steps below:


For a baby (birth to one):
1. Open their airway by gently tilting back the head and lifting the chin.
2. Give rescue breaths. To do this, place your mouth over their mouth and nose and blow steadily for about one second, until the chest rises. Do this five times.
3. Place two fingers on the centre of their chest and give 30 chest compressions by pressing down about a third of their depth.
4. Give two rescue breaths, followed by 30 chest compressions and continue this cycle for about one minute.
5. Call an ambulance and following the cycle of rescue breaths and chest compressions until help arrives or until the baby starts to breathe again.

For a child (one to puberty):
1. Open their airway by gently tilting back the head and lifting the chin.
2. Give rescue breaths. To do this, pinch the nose and give rescue breaths by placing your mouth over their mouth and blow until their chest rises. Repeat five times.
3. Place your hand over the centre of the child’s chest and lean over. Give 30 chest compressions by pressing down about a third of the depth of the chest.
4. Give two rescue breaths, followed by 30 chest compressions and follow this technique for one minute.
5. Call an ambulance and following the cycle of rescue breaths and chest compressions until help arrives or until the child starts to breathe again.

The Recovery Position


If you find your baby or child breathing but unconscious it is important to place them in the recovery position. This prevents them from swallowing their tongue and stops the windpipe from being blocked if they were to be sick. Remember: The procedure is slightly different for babies (under one) and children (aged one to puberty). Follow the steps below:

For a baby (birth to one):
1. Simply hold them with their head tilted downwards.

For a child (birth to one):
1. Place the child’s arm nearest to you at a right angle with their palm facing up.
2. Move their other arm round, placing the back of the hand on the cheek closest to you.
3. Grab the knee furthest from you and pull up until the knee is flat on the floor.
4. Pull the knee towards you whilst keeping the child’s hand pressed against their cheek. Move the leg so it is at a right angle.
5. Make sure the airway remains open by tilting their head back. Check for breathing by feeling and listening for breath.

Burns
Burns and scalds to the skin can be distressing for children. If your child is injured this way, it is important to stay calm and follow the following procedure:
1. Examine the burn.
2. Cool the affected area under cold running for at least ten minutes.
3. Cover the injury with a sterile dressing or cling film.
4. If the burn is severe call 999/112. If the casualty is a child or baby, you should see medical advice no matter how small the burn appears to be.

High Temperatures

If your baby or child looks hot and flushed and is running a high temperature, there are steps you can take to help them recover.
1. Check their temperature- if it is over 37°C it is considered high. The child or enfant may look hot and flushed and may also sweat. Sometimes extremely high temperatures can cause seizures in a baby or young child (twitching and clenched fists are signs of this).
2. If they have a high temperature, remove any blankets and clothing to cool them down.
3. If you can give them some paracetemol-based medicine.
4. If symptoms continue you should seek medical advice or take them to the hospital.

This is not a paid advertisement, and the sole purpose is to provide information for FIRST AID. But as a rule of thumb, calling the emergency hospital hotline should not be disregarded.

1 COMMENT

  1. Hi,i have a suggestion . We should alert while purchasing any toys for baby.its has to be clinically proven safe.because many babies have habit to put their toys in mouth and we never know what material is used for manufacturing.So its an advice to all parents please check whether its CPSC approved or not.its Consumer Product safety commision.They give assurance certificate to the production company. i found Dimple Child. they sell only CPSC approved products like toys,games for babies. its awsome